More from Junior school and their use of colour-coded feedback: outstanding orange and growing green. Not only do the teachers mark, highlight and write comments in one of the two colours but students use them as well to respond in terms of their confidence in their answers. So the whole dialogue is framed in terms of ‘Have I mastered this yet?” and/or “What can I do to improve?”

From Senior school come some examples from the Art department where I spent most of last week. Alongside all the spoken feedback in class teachers provide formal written feedback on any set pieces the students complete using forms that get clipped or attached to the work, highlighting which skills they are and what the next steps are to improve. There is also a space on the form for the students’ responses and it was great to see this in action where a teacher asked a student to fill this in as a summary of the discussion they had just had about her coursework.

Junior school use a consistent system of colour coding to provide feedback both to and from the teacher

Junior school use a consistent system of colour coding to provide feedback both to and from the teacher

The art department have forms with space for both the teacher and student to leave a commentary on their pieces, often after a formal one-to-one discussion in class.

The art department have forms with space for both the teacher and student to leave a commentary on their pieces, often after a formal one-to-one discussion in class,

 

Also from Senior school and on the theme of orange the Drama department use post-it notes stuck on the wall as a rolling record of self and peer-assessment. Students record the skills they have developed and mastered as well as their targets for improvement. These can then be referred to in the build up to the next assessment, taken down and a new post-it added once that assessment has been completed.

The Drama department use working walls of post-it notes as rolling-records of self and peer-assessment (and the related targets for improvement) through the year.

The Drama department use working walls of post-it notes as rolling-records of self and peer-assessment (and the related targets for improvement) through the year.