Reading the World

Tag archives for wider reading

Mesurement (countinue from diligence and “better”)

In the Vietnam War, when a soldier was wounded, their average time from field to the U.S was 45 days. Today it is 4 days. Gunshot mortality dropped from less than 5% today. The reason is not technology. Today there is FSU’s (Forward Surgical Units). They follow the troop battalions. Now when a soldier is […]

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Diligence : Key to get BETTER

Each year 2 million Americans acquire an infection in the hospital and 90,000 die from that infection. Infections are complex as you can get. Where did they come from? How did it happen? When did it start? What type is it? All of these questions are valid and are part of the complex puzzle. After […]

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“Better” – a surgeon’s notes on performance

“Are doctors who make mistakes villains? No, because then we all are.”  A quote from a book called “Better” by Atul Gawande. On a first glance this book is a series of stories and experiences set inside of a hospital, but actually it isn’t. It ends up telling us something unforgettable about the world outside. […]

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Art Now

The book ‘Art Now Vol3’ gives readers a decent insight on the current art scene. Many kinds of art all around the world are present in the book with a decent amount of information about the artists. This way, the readers are allowed to understand the work and the ideas behind it. Having explored the […]

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Seventeen Equations that Changed the World: Pythagoras’s Theorem

I found the title of this books really compelling, and so decided to read this book. In it, for each equation, the chapter starts out on the applications that are easier to understand. The first chapter is about Pythagoras’s theorem. For better understanding of the application, the book starts with telling us a short summary […]

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Why do we buy?

“Buyology” by Martin Lindstorm investigates the reason behind consumer purchasing choices. Lindstorm says that traditional advertisement that we see everywhere, e.g. billboards and commercials between TV shows, no longer work and are not worth the millions that companies spent at all. People like the idea that they are rational thinkers and like to believe that […]

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Self-interest behaviors

According to the theory of Adam Smith, the world’s famous economist, self-interest is defined as acting in the way that is most personally beneficial. He famously explained that it is possible to achieve the best economic benefit for all even when, and in fact because, individuals tend to act in their own self interest. Economists assert […]

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Make it simple!

 In chapter 5 of the book named The Return of the Economic Naturalist, written by Robert H Frank, who has been teaching introductory economics course for forty years, Frank noticed that many people were disappointed when they know what he did for living. He began asking why, many said something like this: ‘ I studied […]

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The overlooked fact of taxing

The Invisible hand theory of Adam Smith predicts that there will always be some factors which correct the market to its equilibrium without needing the government intervention. But, in fact, the invisible hand doesn’t always work well because in reality, the production and consumption of some goods generate costs (negative externality)  or benefits (positive externality) […]

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In The Plex: Applying it to Google ‘Project Glass’ (Author: Steven Levy)

I have posted about what the book is about in a previous post; however I took some of the information from the book to help explain how they might have derived the idea and how they are developing the highly anticipated Google’s  ‘Project Glass’. I researched quite a bit about how they came up with […]

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