Year5

Weekly Review Friday 17th February

Friday 17th February

Thank you for your support over this very busy half term. We have had a productive time learning all about Space. It has been brilliant to see all of the children’s hard work with their Long Term projects and we have been very impressed with the quality of them. Please visit the Year 5 corridor to see the wonderful and informative work on display.

In Literacy this week, the children have been completing and publishing their non-chronological reports ensuring all language and structural features have been included as well as reflecting on their work through careful editing. After half term we will be moving on to instructional texts, before studying The Highwayman (narrative poem) by Alfred Noyes throughout Book Week.

In Maths, we have been using all of our number knowledge to create a Space themed Maths game. Firstly, we analysed different Maths games to inspire us and then we applied out mathematics knowledge to create challenging questions. After half term we will begin our unit of work about fractions and decimals.

In Humanities this week, we completed our learning about the space race and some classes debated who was the ‘winner’ of this very important historical event.

In Science, we conducted a space themed investigation; making rockets and investigating how far they flew with and without fins. The children firstly made a hypothesis before writing a detailed conclusion which referred back to their prediction, incorporated their results and made a generalization.

In Art, we completed our amazing collage work all about the history of space. These will go on display in the corridor during the next half term.

Finally, may we please remind you to check your child’s communication book for their parents evening appointment time.

We wish you a very happy half-term holiday!

Many thanks

The Year 5 Team


Notices:

Monday 27th February – Start of term 2b (Day 6).

Tuesday 28th February  and Wednesday 1st March parents appointments will be held after school in classrooms.

Fully Booked week (From Monday 6th March) is full of exciting activities, including a book swap, storytelling sessions and a character parade. Full details are available on Parent Portal.

Friday 3rd March entries for the bookmark competition for Fully Booked week must be in.

Monday 6th March entries are due on for anyone entering the Reading Fair (which will be held on  Wednesday 8th March).

Friday 10th March there will be a character parade for book week. Children can come dressed as their favourite character and join the junior school in a competition for the best costume.

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5RW space collage

The children have been having lots of fun creating their large-scale space collages this week. Collage is a form of visual art, where the artwork is made from a variety of different forms and media. The children planned their art work last week and when completed, their group pieces will form part of a space timeline which will be displayed in the Year 5 corridor for all to enjoy!

 

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5RW, 5CH PE Kits tomorrow please – No swimming

Please note the following message from Ms Jones (PE):

To get involved with the ethos of the day, we are making the swimming sessions a fun run event on Thursday 16th. Please can students bring their trainers and PE kits.

Many thanks,

Ms Jones 

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5RW Read and Respond – Sleep

The following article, taken from the BBC, highlights some interesting information about sleep. Please read the article carefully and consider the following: Were there any facts you did know? Is there anything you can add to the points below from your own experience or research? Will you make any changes as a result of having read this? What information is different to the first sleep article? What is similar? Which sources can you trust?

Sleep matters

At a glance

How many hours sleep should your child be getting and why is it so important?

Why does sleep matter?

Experts acknowledge that sleep plays a significant role in brain development, and it is therefore important for children to get enough sleep as their bodies grow and mature. Sleep is crucial for teenagers – it is while they are snoozing at night that they release a hormone that is essential for the growth spurt during puberty.

As well as the role it plays in brain development, sleep also plays an important role in our brain’s day-to-day ability to function. Lack of sleep makes it much harder for us to concentrate, and we become forgetful, irritable and prone to being clumsy and making mistakes.

Furthermore, scientific evidence shows that the right amount of night-time sleep is just as important for children’s development as healthy eating and regular exercise.

How much sleep does my primary school child need?

Sleep requirements differ from individual to individual, but in general a younger child needs more sleep than an older one. Between the ages of five and 11, your child will need 10-12 hours of sleep a night.

A bedtime routine is the best way to ensure that your child gets enough sleep. Devise a routine that lasts 30-40 minutes, and includes a bath and the chance to read a story (or stories) together. Try not to change your routine – don’t change it at all during the week, and if you want your child to have a slightly later bedtime at the weekend, then only change it by maybe an hour .

Bedtime is a chance to spend some quality time together, and if it’s a time both you and your child enjoy, your son or daughter will settle down in bed and drop off to sleep more easily.

At stressful times, such as when your child starts in Reception, and at the start of each new school year, your child will probably get more tired than usual and will need more sleep.

In the summer, because of the light evenings, it may be tempting to keep children up later – but try to keep to scheduled bedtimes, and invest in curtains with a blackout lining so the room is dark.

Towards the end of primary school, your son or daughter may start to stay up later in the evening, maybe chatting to friends online, playing games on a console or watching TV. They will find it difficult to get up in the morning and will be tired or irritable during the day if they don’t get enough sleep.

Limit your child’s use of the internet, games consoles and TV in the hour before they go to bed – and ideally don’t allow your son or daughter to have a computer, console or a TV set in their bedroom.

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5RK Read and Respond – Sleep

The following article, taken from the BBC, highlights some interesting information about sleep. Please read the article carefully and consider the following: Were there any facts you did know? Is there anything you can add to the points below from your own experience or research? Will you make any changes as a result of having read this? What information is different to the first sleep article? What is similar? Which sources can you trust?

Sleep matters

At a glance

How many hours sleep should your child be getting and why is it so important?

Why does sleep matter?

Experts acknowledge that sleep plays a significant role in brain development, and it is therefore important for children to get enough sleep as their bodies grow and mature. Sleep is crucial for teenagers – it is while they are snoozing at night that they release a hormone that is essential for the growth spurt during puberty.

As well as the role it plays in brain development, sleep also plays an important role in our brain’s day-to-day ability to function. Lack of sleep makes it much harder for us to concentrate, and we become forgetful, irritable and prone to being clumsy and making mistakes.

Furthermore, scientific evidence shows that the right amount of night-time sleep is just as important for children’s development as healthy eating and regular exercise.

How much sleep does my primary school child need?

Sleep requirements differ from individual to individual, but in general a younger child needs more sleep than an older one. Between the ages of five and 11, your child will need 10-12 hours of sleep a night.

A bedtime routine is the best way to ensure that your child gets enough sleep. Devise a routine that lasts 30-40 minutes, and includes a bath and the chance to read a story (or stories) together. Try not to change your routine – don’t change it at all during the week, and if you want your child to have a slightly later bedtime at the weekend, then only change it by maybe an hour .

Bedtime is a chance to spend some quality time together, and if it’s a time both you and your child enjoy, your son or daughter will settle down in bed and drop off to sleep more easily.

At stressful times, such as when your child starts in Reception, and at the start of each new school year, your child will probably get more tired than usual and will need more sleep.

In the summer, because of the light evenings, it may be tempting to keep children up later – but try to keep to scheduled bedtimes, and invest in curtains with a blackout lining so the room is dark.

Towards the end of primary school, your son or daughter may start to stay up later in the evening, maybe chatting to friends online, playing games on a console or watching TV. They will find it difficult to get up in the morning and will be tired or irritable during the day if they don’t get enough sleep.

Limit your child’s use of the internet, games consoles and TV in the hour before they go to bed – and ideally don’t allow your son or daughter to have a computer, console or a TV set in their bedroom.

1 comment

5LB Read and Respond – Sleep

The following article, taken from the BBC, highlights some interesting information about sleep. Please read the article carefully and consider the following: Were there any facts you did know? Is there anything you can add to the points below from your own experience or research? Will you make any changes as a result of having read this? What information is different to the first sleep article? What is similar? Which sources can you trust?

Sleep matters

At a glance

How many hours sleep should your child be getting and why is it so important?

Why does sleep matter?

Experts acknowledge that sleep plays a significant role in brain development, and it is therefore important for children to get enough sleep as their bodies grow and mature. Sleep is crucial for teenagers – it is while they are snoozing at night that they release a hormone that is essential for the growth spurt during puberty.

As well as the role it plays in brain development, sleep also plays an important role in our brain’s day-to-day ability to function. Lack of sleep makes it much harder for us to concentrate, and we become forgetful, irritable and prone to being clumsy and making mistakes.

Furthermore, scientific evidence shows that the right amount of night-time sleep is just as important for children’s development as healthy eating and regular exercise.

How much sleep does my primary school child need?

Sleep requirements differ from individual to individual, but in general a younger child needs more sleep than an older one. Between the ages of five and 11, your child will need 10-12 hours of sleep a night.

A bedtime routine is the best way to ensure that your child gets enough sleep. Devise a routine that lasts 30-40 minutes, and includes a bath and the chance to read a story (or stories) together. Try not to change your routine – don’t change it at all during the week, and if you want your child to have a slightly later bedtime at the weekend, then only change it by maybe an hour .

Bedtime is a chance to spend some quality time together, and if it’s a time both you and your child enjoy, your son or daughter will settle down in bed and drop off to sleep more easily.

At stressful times, such as when your child starts in Reception, and at the start of each new school year, your child will probably get more tired than usual and will need more sleep.

In the summer, because of the light evenings, it may be tempting to keep children up later – but try to keep to scheduled bedtimes, and invest in curtains with a blackout lining so the room is dark.

Towards the end of primary school, your son or daughter may start to stay up later in the evening, maybe chatting to friends online, playing games on a console or watching TV. They will find it difficult to get up in the morning and will be tired or irritable during the day if they don’t get enough sleep.

Limit your child’s use of the internet, games consoles and TV in the hour before they go to bed – and ideally don’t allow your son or daughter to have a computer, console or a TV set in their bedroom.

8 comments

5CH Read and Respond – Sleep

The following article, taken from the BBC, highlights some interesting information about sleep. Please read the article carefully and consider the following: Were there any facts you did know? Is there anything you can add to the points below from your own experience or research? Will you make any changes as a result of having read this? What information is different to the first sleep article? What is similar? Which sources can you trust?

Sleep matters

At a glance

How many hours sleep should your child be getting and why is it so important?

Why does sleep matter?

Experts acknowledge that sleep plays a significant role in brain development, and it is therefore important for children to get enough sleep as their bodies grow and mature. Sleep is crucial for teenagers – it is while they are snoozing at night that they release a hormone that is essential for the growth spurt during puberty.

As well as the role it plays in brain development, sleep also plays an important role in our brain’s day-to-day ability to function. Lack of sleep makes it much harder for us to concentrate, and we become forgetful, irritable and prone to being clumsy and making mistakes.

Furthermore, scientific evidence shows that the right amount of night-time sleep is just as important for children’s development as healthy eating and regular exercise.

How much sleep does my primary school child need?

Sleep requirements differ from individual to individual, but in general a younger child needs more sleep than an older one. Between the ages of five and 11, your child will need 10-12 hours of sleep a night.

A bedtime routine is the best way to ensure that your child gets enough sleep. Devise a routine that lasts 30-40 minutes, and includes a bath and the chance to read a story (or stories) together. Try not to change your routine – don’t change it at all during the week, and if you want your child to have a slightly later bedtime at the weekend, then only change it by maybe an hour .

Bedtime is a chance to spend some quality time together, and if it’s a time both you and your child enjoy, your son or daughter will settle down in bed and drop off to sleep more easily.

At stressful times, such as when your child starts in Reception, and at the start of each new school year, your child will probably get more tired than usual and will need more sleep.

In the summer, because of the light evenings, it may be tempting to keep children up later – but try to keep to scheduled bedtimes, and invest in curtains with a blackout lining so the room is dark.

Towards the end of primary school, your son or daughter may start to stay up later in the evening, maybe chatting to friends online, playing games on a console or watching TV. They will find it difficult to get up in the morning and will be tired or irritable during the day if they don’t get enough sleep.

Limit your child’s use of the internet, games consoles and TV in the hour before they go to bed – and ideally don’t allow your son or daughter to have a computer, console or a TV set in their bedroom.

No comments yet

5AW Read and Respond – Sleep

The following article, taken from the BBC, highlights some interesting information about sleep. Please read the article carefully and consider the following: Were there any facts you did know? Is there anything you can add to the points below from your own experience or research? Will you make any changes as a result of having read this? What information is different to the first sleep article? What is similar? Which sources can you trust?

Sleep matters

At a glance

How many hours sleep should your child be getting and why is it so important?

Why does sleep matter?

Experts acknowledge that sleep plays a significant role in brain development, and it is therefore important for children to get enough sleep as their bodies grow and mature. Sleep is crucial for teenagers – it is while they are snoozing at night that they release a hormone that is essential for the growth spurt during puberty.

As well as the role it plays in brain development, sleep also plays an important role in our brain’s day-to-day ability to function. Lack of sleep makes it much harder for us to concentrate, and we become forgetful, irritable and prone to being clumsy and making mistakes.

Furthermore, scientific evidence shows that the right amount of night-time sleep is just as important for children’s development as healthy eating and regular exercise.

How much sleep does my primary school child need?

Sleep requirements differ from individual to individual, but in general a younger child needs more sleep than an older one. Between the ages of five and 11, your child will need 10-12 hours of sleep a night.

A bedtime routine is the best way to ensure that your child gets enough sleep. Devise a routine that lasts 30-40 minutes, and includes a bath and the chance to read a story (or stories) together. Try not to change your routine – don’t change it at all during the week, and if you want your child to have a slightly later bedtime at the weekend, then only change it by maybe an hour .

Bedtime is a chance to spend some quality time together, and if it’s a time both you and your child enjoy, your son or daughter will settle down in bed and drop off to sleep more easily.

At stressful times, such as when your child starts in Reception, and at the start of each new school year, your child will probably get more tired than usual and will need more sleep.

In the summer, because of the light evenings, it may be tempting to keep children up later – but try to keep to scheduled bedtimes, and invest in curtains with a blackout lining so the room is dark.

Towards the end of primary school, your son or daughter may start to stay up later in the evening, maybe chatting to friends online, playing games on a console or watching TV. They will find it difficult to get up in the morning and will be tired or irritable during the day if they don’t get enough sleep.

Limit your child’s use of the internet, games consoles and TV in the hour before they go to bed – and ideally don’t allow your son or daughter to have a computer, console or a TV set in their bedroom.

26 comments

Weekly Review 10th February 2017

Friday 3rd February

Year 5 have had another exciting week!  We began with a thrilling Sports Day on Monday. Every team won a HUGE amount of medals and ribbons, as well as house points, for their house. We were really impressed by the children’s enthusiasm – especially in the Welly  Wanging event! It was lovely to see so many parents joining us to cheer on their children.

Also this week, we have been on our visit to the Science museum. We had a fantastic day and really enjoyed being transported into Space in the Dome as well as exploring the activities and learning lots of new science facts. Year 5 showed exemplary behavior and stood out amongst the other schools who were also visiting. Well done!

In Literacy this week, the children have been writing paragraphs for their non-chronological report. We have been focusing on sentence types and sentence openers. There are some very creative ideas for new species of plants and animals.

In Maths, we have continued with our division topic. The children have been practicing written division methods with large and decimal numbers.

In Humanities this week, we decided our position in the debate about the Space race and considered the arguments we will make.

In Science, we continued to explore the size of the universe and looked at the distances between stars and planets in the Milky Way Galaxy and the distance between galaxies.

In Art, we are preparing our resources for our collaging project. We made any final changes to our plans and shared out the work load amongst our group. Our next step is to complete each section of our design and then attach it to our giant boards.

Long term projects: Just a reminder that the children need to complete their final task for Tuesday 14th February.

Finally, may we please remind you that all parents evening appointments need to be booked by Monday. If you wish to see a specialist teacher please sign up at Reception.

Enjoy your weekend.

Many thanks

The Year 5 Team

Notices:

On Thursday 16th February it will be the Fun Run after school. Please ensure you have signed up for this very popular event.

On Friday 17th February You Times will be scheduled as normal and school will finish at the usual time.

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5,4,3,2,1……Lift Off! Year 5 trip to the National Science Museum

What an amazing day! Year 5 enjoyed a thoroughly informative and action packed day at the National Science Museum. The day started with an entertaining science show, where the children learnt all about friction, bumps and bounces – with many children having the opportunity to volunteer and win special prizes. After the show, we split off into two groups and enjoyed the highly informative space dome – with planets, stars and galaxies whizzing past us! The dramatic light show was enjoyed by all and echoes of ‘oooohs’ and ‘aaaaars’ filled the room. We then enjoyed some time experiencing all the installations and interactive models which covered lots of different science topics such as sound, light, forces, space and electricity. We then made our way back to Shrewsbury but could of easily spent longer there. All in all it was a great day enjoyed by all.

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